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Main Content
This exercise reinforced how profoundly interested I am in emergency management. The more I become involved, the more I like it. I also think it’s important to my job in developing communication methods that share vital information in a high-pressure, high-intensity environment. The amount of knowledge in my team that percolated to the surface was astounding, and the amount of support was equally amazing. This is training for people who have to run toward an incident and rely on one another for their own safety and effectiveness, underscoring the value of relationships I formed here among participants. I came away with a much broader and deeper understanding of the myriad resources and challenges associated with a natural disaster or terrorist attack. David Groth; Web Administrator for University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center; New Mexico;

Target Audience/Disciplines

  • Hospital executive group—Senior executives who have ultimate legal and overall fiduciary responsibilities for the institution
  • Midlevel management—Those who have responsibility for activating the disaster plan
  • Patient services group—Senior patient care services leadership who are responsible for the following: organizing and delivering patient care services and resources; maintaining a patient tracking system; assuring the treatment of inpatients and managing the inpatient care areas; and controlling discharge procedures
  • Emergency Department (ED) group—Those responsible for overall clinical and administrative management of the ED resources
  • Physical plant operations group—Those responsible for the physical plant and its environment
  • Emergency Medical Services (EMS)—Those responsible for authorizing policy and/or participating in the formation of policy that determines the response of EMS resources to a disaster
  • Public health group—Those responsible for authorizing policy and/or participating in the formation of policy that determines the public health response to a disaster
  • Other patient care—Patient support areas may be represented, including infection control, chaplains, social workers, legal, and others

Overview

The Healthcare Leadership and Administrative Decision Making is a four-day course which addresses disaster preparedness at the facility and system level. Healthcare leaders must be prepared for any incident that results in multiple casualties—whether it is the result of a natural disaster; an accidental or intentional release of a chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear, or explosives (CBRNE) hazard; or a disease outbreak that results in an epidemic or pandemic. This course focuses on preparing healthcare leaders to make critical decisions in all-hazards disaster emergency preparedness activities. Essential disaster planning response and recovery functions are presented in a lecture/discussion format and applied in a tabletop exercise and a two-day functional exercise.

Below are some, but not all, of the critical skill sets learned during this training program:

  • Clarify healthcare emergency management roles and responsibilities in the disaster life-cycle process—mitigation, preparedness, response, and recovery—for all-hazards disasters
  • Identify key partners in disaster preparedness, their roles, and interrelationships in responding to a disaster
  • Relate the use of the Incident Command System (ICS) in the healthcare system through Hospital Incident Command System (HICS) and the Public Health Incident System (PHICS)
  • Illustrate roles and responsibilities in obtaining and distributing medical supplies in a disaster situation
  • Illustrate the difficult decisions that healthcare leaders face regarding palliative care and mass fatality management
  • Summarize the development of emergency public information and risk communications messages
  • Differentiate requirements for types of decontamination procedures and facilities in addition to personal protective equipment (PPE) to be used in healthcare facilities for a variety of hazards
  • Describe the various concepts associated with the disaster planning process
  • Identify important aspects of Noble, U.S.A., and roles of the functional areas in the exercises
  • Apply Comprehensive Emergency Management (CEM) to a disaster response situation
  • Apply the concepts of healthcare disaster planning
  • Summarize the role of healthcare response in an all-hazards disaster
  • Conduct healthcare response to a disaster
  • Respond to a healthcare all-hazards disaster

Course Length

4.0 days

Course Code

MGT-901

Additional Requirements

To be eligible to attend the Healthcare Leadership and Administrative Decision Making course, the student must successfully complete:

AWR160, Standardized Awareness Training;

IS-100.HCb, Introduction to Incident Command System for Healthcare/Hospitals;

IS-200.HCa, Applying ICS to Healthcare Organizations; and

IS-700.a, National Incident Management System, An Introduction.

Continuing Education Credits

  • The Center for Domestic Preparedness is authorized by IACET to offer 3.2 continuing education units for this program.
  • Nursing through Alabama Board of Nursing (nurses only): 32
  • Continuing Medical Education, through University of Alabama at Birmingham (additional allied health professionals may be able to apply for these continuing medical education units): 32
  • Police Officer Standards and Training (POST), if approved by the student’s state: 32

Related Photos

  • Image: Students in the Healthcare Leadership for Mass Casualty Incidents (HCL) course simulate hospital leadership in the Emergency Operations Center. The 32-hour course lasts four days and includes both classroom instruction and realistic scenario-based exercises�complete with the expected chaos, noise, power failures, media briefs, and even victims from a mass casualty event.
  • Image: Students in the Healthcare Leadership for Mass Casualty Incidents (HCL) course simulate hospital leadership in the Emergency Operations Center. The 32-hour course lasts four days and includes both classroom instruction and realistic scenario-based exercises�complete with the expected chaos, noise, power failures, media briefs, and even victims from a mass casualty event.
  • Image: Students attending the Healthcare Leadership for Mass Casualty Incidents (HCL) course admit patients (role players) to be treated by emergency department personnel. The former Army Noble Hospital was converted into a training site for health and medical education in disasters and mass casualty events.  It serves as the only operational hospital in the U.S. dedicated to training.
  • Image: Emergency medical personnel apply life saving procedures to a Human Patient Simulator while attending training at the CDP�s Noble Training Facility.  The former Army Noble Hospital was converted into a training site for health and medical education in disasters and mass casualty events.  It serves as the only operational hospital in the U.S. dedicated to training.
  • Image: Emergency medical personnel apply life saving procedures to a Human Patient Simulator while attending training at the CDP�s Noble Training Facility.  The former Army Noble Hospital was converted into a training site for health and medical education in disasters and mass casualty events.  It serves as the only operational hospital in the U.S. dedicated to training.

Related Video


Healthcare Leadership for Mass Casualty Incidents