Main Content

Radiological Emergency Response Operations (RERO)

I was recently part of a four-day exercise that involved the management of a nuclear incident. I was more prepared for this exercise largely because of the awesome training I received at the CDP. Strict use of the Incident Command System allowed me and other command staff to manage over 300 people, including 160 role players from the local high school. We coordinated the decontamination process all the way through to medical screening. Sometimes you feel you will never use the training, but it is useful when the time comes. I appreciate the training and the professional relationships I have throughout the country. Greg Bearinger; Registered Nurse; North Carolina

Target Audience/Disciplines

Any member of an organized federal, state, local, or tribal radiological/hazardous materials response element who have responsibility for responding to or managing a radiological incident. Personnel assigned to such teams include fire service, law enforcement, health physicists, industrial hygienists, radiological officers, and other emergency service personnel with similar responsibilities. Local or tribal participants should reside within either of two Emergency Planning Zones (EPZ). The two EPZ’s are described as 1) the plume exposure pathway EPZ has a radius of about 10 miles from the reactor site, or 2) the ingestion exposure pathway EPZ has a radius of about 50 miles from the reactor site. There are over 100 commercial nuclear power reactors in the United States.

An Excel spreadsheet of jurisdictions, broken down by FEMA Region and state, eligible to attend Radiological training courses is available in the additional resources section to the right.

Overview

Radiological Emergency Response Operations is a five-day course offering lectures, hands-on training, and team exercises. The lectures include operational-level radiological concepts using guidance and information from the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS), Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Use of the hands-on training will provide students with the knowledge and skills to perform in a radiological emergency response operation regardless of the type of event. The Radiological Emergency Response Operations course culminates on the fifth day with a final exercise involving the emergency response operations skills and training learned during the course.

As this course is being taught the ARIO course will also be in session with both courses coming together in an Integrated Capstone Event (ICE). The RERO course will focus on 1st Responder hands-on equipment skills and responsibilities as members of a field monitoring team during radiological Plume and Ingestion Pathway incidents whereas the ARIO course will focus on Emergency Operations Center (EOC) responsibilities, coordination of the field monitoring teams, data collection, and developing recommendations for protective actions.

Course Length

5.0 days

Course Code

PER-904

Additional Requirements

To be eligible to attend the Radiological Emergency Response Operations course, a candidate must:

  • Have successfully completed awareness-level training for all-hazards response through AWR-160, Standardized Awareness Training or another certified awareness-level training program.
  • Have successfully completed IS-100.b, Introduction to the Incident Command System
  • Have successfully completed IS-200.b, ICS for Single Resources and Initial Action Incidents.
  • Have successfully completed IS-700.a, National Incident Management System (NIMS), An Introduction.
  • Have successfully completed IS-800.b, National Response Framework (NRF), An Introduction. Any version of the IS-100, 200, 700, and 800 courses are acceptable for the prerequisite requirements.
  • Have successfully completed IS-3, Radiological Emergency Management (FEMA Independent Study Course) or the Fundamental Course for Radiological Response (PER909 or G320).
  • Meet the requirements and standards of Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response (HAZWOPER), 29 C.F.R. § 1910.120(q)(6)(ii), (2009) and/or National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) 472 Standard for Competence of Responders to Hazardous Materials/Weapons of Mass Destruction Incidents, Chapters 5 and 6.7.

Continuing Education Credits

  • The Center for Domestic Preparedness is authorized by IACET to offer 4.0 CEUs for this program.
  • Nursing, through Alabama Board of Nursing (nurses only): 40
  • Police Officer Standards and Training (POST; approved per state): 40

Related Photos

  • Image: Students survey a simulated accident scene that poses a radiological threat.  The CDP, in coordination with the Radiological Emergency Preparedness Program (REPP) office of the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), offers courses focusing on radiological preparedness in communities across the United States.  Basic and more advanced-level training is designed to improve skills and center on response plans and procedures for complex incidents such as a terrorist or mass casualty event.
  • Image: A student surveys an area for potential radiation hazards at the CDP during a simulated accident.  The radiological survey entry team discovers two containers displaying radiological hazard symbols.
  • Image: Students attending radiological training measure the radiation exposure rate they have encountered during a simulated accident at the CDP.  The CDP courses use live radiation sources, and focus on the response and management of a radiological event.  More advanced-level training is designed to improve skills and center on response plans and procedures for complex incidents such as a terrorist or mass casualty event.
  • Image: Students at the CDP survey a simulated accident scene that poses a radiological threat.  Basic and more advanced-level training is designed to improve skills and center on response plans and procedures for complex incidents such as a terrorist or mass casualty event.